Posts Tagged 'PR'

Cultural Appropriation and Brand Advertisements: What Could Go Wrong?

See the source image

Image from ethicsalarms.com

For PR folks, the Ford Superbowl LII ad for Dodge pickups raises the issue, if not of diversity, then of extrapolation without context. The ad came under fire almost immediately for using excerpts from one of Dr. Martin Luther King’s “Drum Major” speeches, under compelling visuals, to promote the pickup brand. While not among the most offensive examples of commercial appropriation, it does raise questions of corporate insensitivity and points to the dangers of perhaps well-intended marketing folks extrapolating information—even for well-intended, though nonetheless brand-promotion purposes—without a full appreciation and context for what’s being used. Let’s examine more closely why this is a good case in point of good intentions backfiring.

Clearly, the focus of the ad is serving—humanity helping humanity at all levels of the human experience. What could be wrong with that? Next point is that the ad was an obvious bow to our nation’s recognition of February as the “official” African-American history month, ergo, the use of Dr. King’s thought-provoking words and speech. The problem with juxtaposing the two ideas into a commercial spot for trucks is more clearly spelled out in this AL.com story originally from the Washington Post. Bottom line, Dr. King goes on in this same speech to talk about the dangersImage result for dr. king public domain of materialism, and particularly uses the purchase of expensive vehicles as an example. The context would surely be a double-edged sword for a commercial message, especially for an automaker.

Many found the ad insensitive, at the least, even without knowing the full context or full speech. The clear lesson for PR, advertising and marketing folks, once again, is before adopting cultural messages and touchstones into brand ads, be sure you understand the full context.

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Public Relations and Diversity

Coming into 2018, the perennial question of diversity in media industries–specifically, public relations–continues to be a major issue. When will the talk result in action? And not simply action addressing a “pipeline” for those yet to enter the field, but action opening doors to experienced PR pros now looking for advancement and opportunity within the senior ranks of the field. Some of those questions are answered in this essay on public relations diversity by PR management consultant Rick Gould. On other aspects, we suggest evaluating the evidence by the same standards as PR professionals are typically measured–based on outcomes and results, rather than effort. You can read Gould’s article here.

And merely days later, writer Aarti Shah provides additional insights into the slow progress toward diverse staffing in PR and marketing industries. Read it in Forbes.

The industry has grappled for more than a decade with diversity initiatives that have made, at best, modest dents on a longstanding problem.”

Public Relations: 2018

  • Image result for new year's

 

The cusp of a new year is a traditional time for reflecting on the past year and anticipating what lies ahead. We found this short article, which we think provides PR pros an excellent guide to public relations in 2018. Here’s a sampling:

All PR is tech PR
As media continues to digitize, it’ll be adopting emerging technologies into its day-to-day content production. The rise of emerging tech—virtual reality, augmented reality, artificial intelligence—affects and informs media’s push for digital. It’s a new content sandbox for publishers and their advertisers to operate in creatively, free of print’s two-dimensional limitations.

Enjoy, and get ready! Read more here. And, be sure to let us know how you see public relations in the coming year.

 

 

When PR is Bad, Sometimes Nothing is Worse

Image via Ph Communications

When public relations advice is bad, sometimes nothing could be worse. Such was apparently the case with Bell Pottinger, a British PR firm that last week was booted out of the UK’s professional body for bad practices. This was more than a case of conduct unbecoming. In fact, the Public Relations and Communications Association invoked its harshest penalty ever by expelling Bell Pottinger for inciting racial divisions during elections in South Africa. A toxic development for a country already fraught with racial divisions of historical proportions.

Truly, when public relations is bad, almost nothing is worse. It’s instructive for all business professionals, but particularly public relations folks, as well as the public at-large to understand the slippery slope of what went wrong at Bell Pottinger. Read a full report, including the statement from the PRCA, here.

Breaking News Development:  Since we posted this story. Bell Pottinger’s demise reported imminent for its public relations misdeeds.  Read it here. 

MORE BREAKING DEVELOPMENTS: (9/15/17) Things get worse for Bell Pottinger. Latest reports say they’ve earned this moniker: “Worst Ethical Breach In History.” Story here.

What Will PR Look Like in 2017?

2017-countdown

Hello, and Happy 2017!

We’ve read a lot of predictions and assessments about public relations and media coming into 2017. Here’s one reposted here from AdWorld, that pretty much describes that landscape that we see. If you’re not familiar with the terms media convergence, reputation management, influencer marketing, big data, etc., you’ll surely want to read on. Even if you are, this is a good read to make sure you’re ready. We’re also eager to compare notes and find out what you’re thinking and seeing for 2017, so please don’t forget to comment at the end.


Like many industries, the world of public relations is changing rapidly. Michael O’Keeffe, chief executive of PSG Communications looks at ten key trends that will have an impact of PR professionals

  1. Convergence

There was a time, not long ago, when you knew who your competition was. They offered the same services more or less, charged in around the same as you and looked and talked pretty much like you did. Now however, all has changed. Read more.

PR Or Lobbying? Astroturfing by Another Name

So, we’re back briefly on one of our favorite topics–public relations vs. lobbying. This time, Public Relations (PR) Concept.
U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren weighs in on astroturfing, or lobbying under the guise of public relations, via the New York Times video.
“This Is Thinly Disguised Lobbying,” she says. Check it out here: http://nyti.ms/2aGaAYo

When PR Pros Are Required to Register As Lobbyists: A Case Study

business interactions

From Ireland, here’s a case study that shows what happens when PR people aren’t vigilant against legislation that equates public relations activities with lobbying. In sum, PR pros register, others don’t.

Calls to ‘name and shame’ non-compliant lobbyists

PR industry believes legal and other professions have not reported lobbying activities

Legal firms engaged in lobbying activity are not thought to be complying with the legislation to the same extent as public relations professionals.

Organisations that do not comply with lobbying legislation introduced last September should be “named and shamed”, the Public Relations Institute of Ireland (PRII) has suggested. Read the full story from Irish Times here: http://www.irishtimes.com/business/media-and-marketing/calls-to-name-and-shame-non-compliant-lobbyists-1.2653590

Blurred Lines: When Marketing, PR, and Content Overlap

Worth repeating … we ran across this article a short time ago and thought it caught the essence of what it’s like for PR pros and marketers in this new world order of content development and social media. So we’re re-blogging it here to share ideas on how you can competitively maximize the potential of a truly integrated marketing effort. We’re sure you’ll enjoy reading, and perhaps learn some new ideas too! Be sure to let us know below.

Blurred Lines: When Marketing, PR, and Content Overlap

by Aly Saxe  |

March 17, 2016   |  4,165 views

From social selling to new opportunities with mobile advertising, every marketing organization now has a cornucopia of channels through which to work its magic.

Yet, different channels and opportunities demand different skills, and the effort needed to coordinate all the necessary components and team members is immense. It can be confusing at best, unproductive at worst.

Let’s take a simple example: an infographic.

You’ve compiled the information and applied beautiful design. Now what? You probably have 10 different channels to send it through. Should one person own every channel and strategy for promotion? I mean, it’s just a simple infographic, right?

The answer is “no,” and here’s why.

Read more: http://www.marketingprofs.com/articles/2016/29554/blurred-lines-when-marketing-pr-and-content-strategy-overlap#



 

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More noteworthy news: If you’re a regular, or even occasional reader of the PRDoctorChicago blog, you know that a subject near and dear to us is the difference between public relations and lobbying. We frequently write about and advocate for a better understanding of the differences between the two communications disciplines. To that end, we express kudos to major PR organizations and firms who stepped up in March to challenge the New York State Ethics Commission ruling equating public relations communications with lobbying. This is a significant step, and one that bears watching, as the industry moves forward to challenge the efforts of those outside of PR to define what the industry is. In case you missed, simply click this link for an overview of event.

It’s Public Relations, Not Lobbying!

Despite arguments to the contrary, New York State’s Joint Commission on Public Ethics has ruled to expand the definition of lobbying to include PR professionals–a prospect we called chilling, and now actually alarming.

To help make our case against this ruling, we call forth this missive from the nation’s “community organizer in chief.”

“To my mind, there’s a difference between a corporate lobby whose clout is based on money alone, and a group of like-minded individuals–whether they be textile workers, gun aficionados, veterans or family farmers–coming together to promote their interests; between those who use their economic power to magnify their political influence far beyond what their numbers might justify and those who are simply seeking to pool their votes to sway their representatives. The former subvert the very idea of democracy. The latter are its essence.”

-Barack Obama, The Audacity of Hope

Barack Obama campaigning on street

Public Relations vs. Lobbying-Part II

business interactions

By far, one of our most popular posts was on the topic of Public Relations and Lobbying, published back in 2012. Since that time the post has been continuously circulating. With proposals potentially impacting public relations now being reviewed in the legislatures of several states, the circumstances call for a timely update.

The most well-known of those bills now being considered is in New York, which follows the pattern of similarly controversial proposals in Massachusetts and Los Angeles. These bills range from proposals requiring public relations professionals to register as lobbyists to those that would restrict lobbying efforts by nonprofits. As we said before, such proposals would seem to us to have a chilling effect on the public relations profession, but to also raise the alarming spectre of infringements on free speech and social justice.

The blurring line between public relations and numerous other disciplines, including lobbying, calls for PR people to be alert and vigilant on understanding the differences between these professions.

As we said in our previous posts, citizens have a long history of organizing and petitioning our government for redress and for actions on behalf of the common good. We liken such grassroots movements to the Federalist Papers, which helped establish the basis of governing in our democratic society. And yes, while we are aware and watchful of many disguised special interests who have, and continue to hijack or simulate grassroots movements to achieve self-serving ends—a disingenuous practice known as astroturfing—we, nonetheless, think the right of citizens to organize and to use legitimate public relations practice to raise awareness and advance their causes is a protected right. Such is guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution. It is the tenets of the profession—not occasional overlapping methods—that we believe favorably distinguishes public relations from similar activities and pursuits.

Public relations

does not seek

negative

outcomes.

In more than 30 years of public relations practice, our mantra has always been: Public relations does not seek negative outcomes. In other words, PR doesn’t seek to tear down something else; we use it to constructively demonstrate the positive attributes or reasonings behind our cause—in other words, building something up: an idea, a cause, a product, a service, a solution, etc. And we do so with persuasion as our principal tool. It’s the honest value, true belief in and understanding of the benefits of our client’s position that fuels our work.

So, despite a popular belief, especially during this political season, that “going negative” in method, outreach or advertising works, we firmly believe that going negative in outcome, approach, message, methodology, etc., will never achieve big-picture goals and the objectives needed to anchor public relations. On those rare occasions when we make comparisons, the differentiations are based on real differences, and not on the cynical notion of winning by making the other side lose.


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