Archive for October, 2015

Don’t Undervalue the Expertise of Baby Boomers

In PR, technology or anything else

Proud to be in business

 

It certainly wasn’t the first time it’s happened. We were sitting in a seminar about PR 2.0, digital PR and content marketing, etc., when one of the panelists began holding forth on marketing to Millennials. As she began talking about Gen-Xers, then Millennials (she, herself, clearly being one of the two), she announced how much they love “authenticity,” and conversely, hate “marketing and spin.” She then gave the requisite nod to Baby Boomers, asking if there were any “Boomers” in the room, adding condescendingly, “I love them.” So it began …

As she continued, she gave an example of “marketing spin” from a high-end, luxury auto brand, describing its auto-industry jargon as almost unintelligible. This, she more or less declared, was the kind of marketing-speak perpetrated by Baby Boomers that Millennials had come to deplore. Sprinkled in between were plaudits about the necessity for transparency in business, with a passing reference to her own marital woes and even infidelity. At another point she laughed and denounced what appeared to be an obvious misspelling of the word “command” (spelled ‘COMAND’) on the auto company’s website. In the meantime, from the start of her profanity-laden presentation, some of us couldn’t help but be struck by the continuous misspelling of the word “Millennials” (displayed throughout her slides as “millenials.”) Need we say more?

It’s become vogue in some circles of media, PR and technology to bash Baby Boomers as somehow out of step, out of date, and whose expertise is now expired (even if one of them happens to be your boss). And sadly, except perhaps at the C-suite level—these same industries of PR, social and digital media, and technology, etc.—are giving increasing deference and higher visibility to those espousing such cliché notions. Well, we understand why—it’s all about the dynamics of marketplace. According to the Case Foundation, Millennials now make up a majority of the workforce: 53.3 million, or 1 in 3 American workers. Nonetheless, we wanted to be among the first to denounce the underlying fallacy behind this trend of ‘dissing’ Boomers. (BTW, think we’re alone? Check out this post about the “age” problem in the advertising world.)

Sure, at this site we’re mostly Boomers, but that’s not the critical point. The critical point is today we’re giving more and more credence to and putting more of these “youth” marketing (or should I say anti-marketing) masterminds on a pedestal, not bothering to question in even the slightest the real value of what they’re saying or the consistency in the standards that we normally apply to good marketing and good business. (Is it really necessary or appropriate to explain your marital infidelity or use profanity to punctuate each point to demonstrate “authenticity?” Isn’t one misspelling in professional copy as bad as another?)

Without pillorying anybody, we simply want to point out that while Baby Boomers have been party to many things that need fixing in this world, they’re also responsible for some of the advances that have radically changed the world for the better on many fronts—socially, politically, economically, technologically, culturally, etc. And while others or now picking up the mantle, many Boomers continue to be engaged and involved in advancing our respective fields. We’re not all on the march to retirement. We know, for example, those of us behind PRDoctorChicago, take considerable effort to stay current in communications technology and trends, not only for our own expertise, but for the benefit of our clients.

So, despite the growing trend to associate everyone over 40 in PR, media and technology as modern-day dinosaurs, let’s recognize that many Boomers in these fields have gratefully accepted the challenge to learn new skills and up-end old ways of thinking to help pioneer a whole new communications industry; and that while these industries have no doubt evolved, we’ve evolved right along with them. Today many Boomers not only bring newly acquired technical skills and understandings, but also have the added value of proficiency in judgment and critical thinking that come with experience. Increasingly, gauging from business and industry headlines, these are assets in uncommonly short supply.  So, to our way of thinking, in a few words, the tagline to Robert DeNiro’s latest feature film, “The Intern,” says it all: “Experience never gets old.

Share your thoughts below.


Follow prdoctorchicago on WordPress.com

prdoctorchicago

Follow me on Twitter